Guest Blog Article: Music Therapy and How It Can Help Your Child with ADHD

Last year, we had Life Coach Julie Morris share about “Learning New Hobbies at any stage of your life”.  Click here for that article.   Today, she shares with us the benefits of music in relation to ADHD.photo-1481207801830-97f0f9a1337e

By Life Coach Julie Morris

website: http://juliemorris.org/

Music Therapy and How It Can Help Your Child with ADHD

Parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are always looking for new ways to help their child, and their efforts are often met with frustration and dead ends. Many parents are wary of relying too heavily on medication, and thus want to find natural, safe, holistic methods to help their children focus and succeed. While there is no blanket solution for ADHD, there is growing evidence that music therapy can be of great benefit.

Anyone can participate in music therapy

According to the American Music Therapy Association, music therapy is a practice in which “music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, emotional, cognitive, and social needs of individuals.” One does not have to be a skilled musician to benefit from music therapy, and it can encompass listening to, performing, or even composing music.

Music Therapy and ADHD

Why is music therapy increasingly being used as a treatment strategy for children with ADHD? One theory is that it may have to do with the structure music provides, which enhances one’s executive functioning. ADHD is, in essence, an inability to focus and lack of structure. Music is all about structure, cohesiveness, and the ability for many parts to work together as a whole. The subtle introduction of music into the activities of kids with ADHD can help to improve multitasking.
Psychology Today has another thought on why music therapy is so helpful to those with ADHD, and it’s backed up by a lot of science. ADHD is characterized by a lack of dopamine in the brain. Stimulants are often prescribed to those with ADHD, because they spike dopamine levels. Dopamine is crucial to the brain’s ability to work on a synapse level. You may see where this is going … music is proven to cause the release of dopamine in the brain. Thus, it’s a natural way to achieve similar results to prescription medication.

How you can practice music therapy at home

Regardless of you musical knowledge, start experimenting with using music to help your child focus and calm down. There is no perfect music therapy method. Every child is different. You should try a combination of listening to music, singing, and even composition or writing lyrics. See what works for your child. The jury is still out on the best type of music for ADHD music therapy, as it kind of depends on what you’re trying to accomplish. Experiment with your child and see what promotes the desired effect. A good place to start is with some wordless, rhythm-heavy pieces. Try these classical masterpieces.

Using music in conjunction with a calm, organized home environment

Unfortunately, you can’t solve everything with music (as nice as that would be). Music needs to be used as therapy in a therapeutic environment. You must create a safe, calm, and organized home environment before you begin to experiment with music therapy.

“Children with ADHD often function better when their environments are conducive to learning. Maintaining a neat, orderly home, implementing routines and systems, and teaching your child the skills she needs to stay organized and on-task will help her cope more readily with the demands she faces at school and at home on a day-to-day basis,” according to HomeAdvisor.

Every child is different. ADHD can affect a child’s behavior in different ways at different times of the day, and it can vary from week-to-week or month-to-month. Music has a proven track record of helping people with ADHD focus, remain cognitively engaged, and improve their self-esteem and social skills. You can surely consult a licensed music therapist — and that may be your best option — but music is music no matter where and how it’s consumed. You can begin to experiment with music therapy to help your child today, at home

 

Photo by Alphacolor 13 on Unsplash

Yamaha Music’s Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative (with Lindsey Stirling Performance)

In my final year of law school in England, I had my dissertation paper on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and it’s relevance in the modern world.  So this article from Strings Magazine really caught my eye in doing it in relation to music education being an educator of Music myself. Though this was all the way archive from September 2016, it still left me with a warm feeling that people were being helped by big corporations like Yamaha with their new Music Essentials programme.

This would help music educators to get funding in projects they are embarking on for their students. Music production events are always hefty costs (which I do every twice a year for my students) sometimes costing thousands just for venue rental and other ancillary costs. Wish I could get into this Music Essentials programme too since we do concerts twice a year!

However, at this point my contribution though small, I have priced our Violins and bows (Belcanto Violins) at a reasonable cost, made affordable for more to enjoy a good sounding instrument without a having to compromise on quality. I also donate some Violins to schools around Singapore to promote music education. Interested Schools with violin programs or other art forms do contact us on this. At Belcanto Violins, we support every art form and would be glad to help to be sponsor/partner/donor to your programme.