Invited to Careers Education Day at Singapore Chinese Girls’ School

This was my first ever time speaking about my Career officially at any event so I was not sure what to expect.  We had a couple of speakers for the different art groups, for music it was just my fellow Alumni Lin Si Tong (Instagram linsitong, is a Chinese lyricist and Music Producer for Dramas and other Mandarin Songs) and I.  This was great as she covered the students who aspired to go contemporary and I addressed the students who were interested in sticking with Classical.  Though both of our Careers do overlap somewhat as we still need to practice a lot and be good with our pitch; and we both love to teach!

It was nice to be back in my old school after leaving for so long and meeting most of the teachers who still almost looked the same (to me). Talking to the students and meeting others from the art industry made me realize that it is really not out of necessity that we do what we do every day but for the passion and love for our art that we wake up an try our best with our careers even though what we do sometimes seem more obscure than a more conventional job.

It is truly a blessing to have a talent to share with others, so those of you reading this who is good with any form of musical or artistic talent, do try your best to nurture it. Your creativity is unique and original and even if it seems insignificant, there will be an eager someone who will be truly inspired by your art! Thank you SCGS for giving me the opportunity to share and realize this ❤️

The secrets of Teaching – Dorothy DeLay

Here is a very useful article on teaching the violin – Dorothy DeLay is one of the most renowned teachers of the Juilliard School. She is responsible for the successes of well known recording violinists out there like Gil Shaham, Midori, Sarah Chang, Shlomo Mintz just to name a few. 

I have read her biography “Teaching Genius” written by Barbara Sand, actually twice as I was trying to decide whether or not to do my enrollment in a music conservatory and be a musician for real.  It was an insightful read to discover life in a music conservatory, though I was a little disappointed that there weren’t many pointers on actually learning the violin, which it isn’t such a book I suppose! 

She has a unique way of teaching which makes a student work hard at getting good while enjoying the process of becoming successful. She also understood clearly the business of being a professional musician and was good at it. One of my heroes for sure. 

Click here for the full article from The Strad Magazine